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How we came to Kitware
Kitwareans are a diverse group of people. It is therefore fitting that they came to Kitware in a variety of ways. Below are a few stories on how folks made their way here. For even more detail, click "read more" to see their full profile.

Berk Geveci
I started at Kitware as an R&D Engineer (though there were no formal titles then). I was promoted to Project Lead; Andy Cedilnik and I were the first people given that title. From there, I became a Technical Leader, Director of Scientific Computing, and then Senior Director of Scientific Computing. This progression was a combination of being in the right place at the right time, working hard (but not too hard :-)), and accepting responsibility and challenges, even though that sometimes made my stomach jump. (I remember how nervous I was the first I had to go present to bunch of folks from the Terascale Supernova team.)   Read more...

Sebastien Barre
I had started my Ph.D. in France back in the 90s when I first heard of VTK, our flagship open-source project. My thesis involved facial surgery simulation, 3D reconstruction, and physical modeling. VTK was still in its infancy at General Electric back then, but it proved to be quite helpful for my biomedical endeavors. I shared some of my code, got involved on the mailing list early on, and, by the time Kitware had been created, I had become one of the first European contributors to the toolkit. When I got done with my doctorate, Kitware, probably no more than six or seven employees strong, made me an official offer to join. Rumor is that it had become way more economical to hire me than to waste hours answering my questions online. I flew to Upstate N.Y. in September 2001, with a few bottles of wine in tow, and I've been here ever since.   Read more...

Ken Martin
Before starting Kitware, I worked in the R&D labs of a large multinational conglomerate. To protect their identity, I’ll just call them “Umbrella Corporation.” That is not their real name, and they did not do much research on zombies per se, but there were a lot of smart folks walking around in lab coats and a management team focused on the bottom line. They did a fair amount of military R&D as well. But again, no zombie research to my knowledge. It was, and still is, a great company but, eventually, I decided it was time to start a new business. I had been developing the open-source Visualization Toolkit and wanted a more fertile environment to help it grow. I was also looking for a place to build a company where I could try some more techie-focused business practices. From the early days, my interests in operations and finance continued to grow until the point where my day is now filled with Kitware's operations and finances.   Read more...

Lai-Yee Burnham
I was working full-time in office management and finishing up a B.S. in Business Administration when my friend told me about an opening his company had in the finance department. My goal had been to finish my BS before looking for work in the financial field, but after hearing about how awesome his company was, I decided to take a chance. And well, Kitware took a chance on me!   Read more...

Lisa Avila
Somewhere early in 1998, Will and Ken began acting on their goal of starting a company around VTK. At that time I was fairly certain that entrepreneurship was not for me - give me a nice solid steady job because I hate uncertainty. I am truly thankful now that they asked me to be part of this endeavor, and that I was smart enough to say "yes". My decision was primarily motivated by my desire to develop code that would be broadly used. At a large company, there are many barriers to collaboration - but at our own small company, based on an open source project, collaboration would be a key element.   Read more...

Marcus Hanwell
I met Bill Hoffman at a KDE conference in Jamaica, just as I began looking for a new job after my postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh. The final slide of my presentation at the conference mentioned that I was looking for a new position. Bill approached me after my talk and told me about all the amazing open-source projects going on at Kitware that were tackling major scientific challenges. He was interested in Avogadro, a project I had presented, and the rest is history.   Read more...

Roni Choudhury
Toward the end of my graduate-school career, I started to realize that my biggest passion was in creating software systems that work well, even if they incorporate experimental, cutting edge ideas from scientific fields. As I started thinking about what I could do after graduation, a friend of mine at Kitware told me I should consider applying. Out of curiosity, I did. I was very impressed with the wide array of applications on which Kitware engineers work, and it looked like my experience with visualization—coupled with my urge to create solid, usable software systems—might make me and Kitware a good match. In August of 2012, when I started at Kitware as a Research and Development Engineer, I found out just how good a match it was.   Read more...

Tami Grasso
I got an e-mail just before getting on a plane to go to Disney with my husband and kids saying that Kitware had a job opening. I am so glad that I checked my e-mail instead of packing! I promptly interviewed and then started with Kitware at the end of March 2011 as an Office Assistant.   Read more...